3D Printing comes to the rescue for a diving instructor

10 Nov

3D Printing comes to the rescue for a diving instructor

Over the past few years, technological evolution has touched not only the engineering part but also the healthcare part. The complicated case of Katherine Dance, a British diving instructor gives base to this fact. Basically from Binfield, Katherine, 42, now lives in Greece discovered a lump on her forehead whilst scuba-diving in the Mediterranean country in October 2014. She didn’t give too much concern to it in the initial stage with a presumption that she simply rammed her head somewhere. But for aquatics expert, the reality was much more horrible.

3D Printing comes to the rescue for a diving instructor?

Next month, when she was in England to meet her relatives, her optometrist in Basingstoke encountered some unwanted symptoms. This is when Vision Express employee advised Dance to undergo blood tests, a CT scan, and an MRI scan and the result was completely shocking.

The diving instructor was having not one, not two, but five tumors in her head. Hearing this truth was devastating and frightful. The lump which she didn’t take seriously became a horrible truth of her life.

The CT and MRI scans revealed that she had three tumors on her left side of the brain and two on the right side. She realized that things could have been more devastating if tumors have not been found in their preliminary stage. Post two months, she underwent a risky surgery to get the tumors removed and tested for cancer. Due to the underlying complications, the surgery took 14 hours, which were scheduled for 6 hours earlier.

3D Printing comes to the rescue for a diving instructor?

The trauma has had a monstrous impact on the life of Dance and her husband Jason, who delivered his full support in her wife’s turbulent times. A person who used to be a highly active person and a sporty lifestyle finds it difficult to even walk today.

During the surgery, tumors were removed, but there was a missing piece of bone in Dance’s skull which seeks operation. Instead of resorting to a metal plate, Dance relied on 3D printing technology to fill that gap. By using 3D images procured from scans, healthcare professionals create a customized implant for Dance that facilitates both protection and physiological ease.

3D Printing comes to the rescue for a diving instructor?

In today’s times, 3D printing technology has been playing a great role in the healthcare industry by assisting patients like Dance. This case is just an example how this technology can become a boon to a number of medical procedures.