New 3D printing tech at Hong Kong PolyU

17 Nov

New 3D printing tech at Hong Kong PolyU

In the wake of setting up a 620-square-meter 3D printing lab containing more than 50 3D printers, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has now put resources into a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) framework, which can help the doctors in the preparation of heart treatments.

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which is a procedure frequently saved for elderly patients is a new procedure that is performed for treating heart valve diseases like aortic valve stenosis, a narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart.

The process of Tavi heart procedure

During the procedure, a balloon at the end of a catheter is passed into the heart and inflated to open up room for a new valve. Once the new valve is in place, the balloon and catheter can be removed. While less invasive than heart valve surgery, the procedure can be risky, and it is therefore in a patient’s interests for their doctor to be fully prepared for the procedure—in any way they can be.

While performing the procedure a balloon is passed into the heart at the end of a catheter and it is blown out to open up space for another valve. Once the new valve occupies its space the balloon and catheter are removed. While less obtrusive than a heart valve surgery, the method can be dangerous, and in this way to a patient's advantage for their specialist to be completely arranged for the technique—in any capacity they can be.

Polytechnic University has put resources into a TAVI

It is on account of this that the Hong Kong Polytechnic University has put resources into a TAVI recreation framework, comprising of 3D printing and restorative imaging hardware, which permits specialists to make patient-specific replica heart valves on which they can practice the doubtful procedures. At a cost of around 300,000 HKD ($38,500), the framework isn't cheap, yet PolyU staff trust that the cutting edge gear could make TAVI strategies significantly more secure for patients at Hong Kong's Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and in addition elevating PolyU's exploration administrations to reinforce participation with the business.

The new TAVI recreation framework, which utilizes 3D printing gear to create restorative models from silicone and polyurethane, is a piece of a coordinated exertion from PolyU to increasing its 3D printing facilities. The college settled a 620-square-meter 3D printing lab containing more than 50 3D printers, at a cost of more than 45 million HKD ($5.8 million). The lab likewise contains 3D examining gear, PCs stacked with CAD programming, and other cutting edge hardware.

Li Gengyuan, an advisor at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, has been rehearsing for TAVI strategies utilizing the new recreation framework. As a major aspect of his preparation, the doctor's facility has set up a "coaching framework" in which specialists like Li must practice the TAVI strategy around five times under the supervision of a senior specialist. When this preparation is finished, the specialists will evidently be set up for the genuine article. Of Queen Elizabeth Hospital's 15 cardiologists, six are presently familiar with the TAVI method.

Image Credits : Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)

Chris Joel (Author)

New 3D printing tech at Hong Kong PolyU
Chris Joel is a writer at 3D Printers Online Store. Hailing from South London, he has a degree in English Literature. His interests include the application of 3D printing technology to art and its popularization.