The World's Largest 3D Printed Structure

06 Sep

The World's Largest 3D Printed Structure

3D printing – a technology essentially created to help engineers in prototyping has certainly touched new highs of innovations, becoming more than a tool of assistance in nearly every vertical today. Novelties associated with 3D printing technology are quite inspiring which have led us to believe that 3D printers are no longer about propelling hand-sized pieces, rather something that has made its way to the Guinness Book of World Records. It is the Rise Pavilion in Beijing, created by design agency DeFacto that has won the title of World's Largest 3D Printed Structure on August 20th, 2016.

This new structure from De Facto has ousted the previous title holder in this category – the Vulcan Pavilion which measured 8.08 meters in length and 2.88 meters in height. This impressive and rather giant 3D structure which spans an area of 110 square meters with 3.4 meters height, is the result of the collaborative effort of Chinese RISE Education Group, Beijing uCRobotics Technology, Edelman and DeFacto. The total weight of the 3D pavilion is 1.87 tons. The giant structure was created using FDM 3D printing equipment and biodegradable PLA filament.

Rise Pavilion Beijing?

The entire print work is reported to have been wrapped up in 45 days using an impressive fleet of 70 desktop 3D printers. The printed 3D hollow blocks were later assembled by a specialized force of helpers. Owing to the modular block system, the whole structure was assembled within the shortest span of 3 days. The 3D printed formation essentially consists of five main components forming the petals of the design, each made with different 3D printed hollow blocks in monochrome shades. Approximately 5370 3D printed blocks formed part of the final phase of construction, each doubling up as planters, lampshades and magazine holders. Moreover, the individual blocks have been designed with varying infills sans extra support materials to reduce wastage and ensure different translucencies.

Rise Education’s Young Creator Cup - Inspiration behind the innovative Rise Pavilion

The eye-catching 3D pavilion drew its inspiration from Rise Education’s Young Creator Cup and comprises five arcs that represent Transportation, Health, Society, Art & Design and Education.  Rise Pavilion is skillfully crafted to act as an exhibition space where 3D printed models with attached QR codes can be displayed. These QR codes can be scanned to link videos during competitions held by Young Creator’s Cup for student 3D printing projects. The pavilion is planned to be taken down as soon as the exhibition ends but the good news is that all the individual parts of Rise Pavilion, Beijing can be recycled and reused.

Rise Pavilion Beijing?

Upcycling of the structure can be done rather ingeniously owing to the specially conceived design by American architect Leandro Rolon. The 3D Rise Pavilion was held open for display at Longhu Era building in the Daxing District in Beijing from August 21 to September 6, 2016 as part of the Young Creator Cup exhibition. According to an official, the ultimate goal of this project was to encourage “a shift towards multi-functional and environmentally friendly goods”, making the young generation more proactive about ecological designs and recycling.

The Rise Pavilion is a clear testament that 3D printing technology operates from nanoscale to the largest possible structures. To buy the latest, highly efficient and best-in-class 3D printers, click here.